Testosterone drug interactions

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Other side effects include increased risk of heart problems in older men with poor mobility, according to a 2009 study at Boston Medical Center. A 2017 study published in JAMA found that treatments increase coronary artery plaque volume. Additionally, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires manufactures to include a notice on the labeling that states taking testosterone treatments can lead to possible increased risk of heart attacks and strokes. The FDA recommends that patients using testosterone should seek medical attention right away if they have these symptoms:

Axiron is a solution of testosterone that is administered through the skin of the armpit for treatment of low testosterone levels. It belongs to a class of drugs called androgens. Other testosterone replacement products include Androderm , Androgel , Testim, and Fortesta. Testosterone is the major male sex hormone responsible for the normal growth and development of the male sex organs and secondary sex characteristics. These effects include development of the prostate, penis and scrotum; distribution of facial, pubic, chest and axillary hair; development of a deep voice and alterations in muscle mass and fat distribution. Low production of testosterone leads to erectile dysfunction , reduced sexual desire, fatigue and loss of energy, depression , regression of secondary sexual characteristics and weakening of bones ( osteoporosis ). Testosterone replacement products supplement or replace natural production of testosterone and reverse symptoms of low testosterone levels. The FDA approved Axiron in November 2010.

The second theory is similar and is known as "evolutionary neuroandrogenic (ENA) theory of male aggression". [79] [80] Testosterone and other androgens have evolved to masculinize a brain in order to be competitive even to the point of risking harm to the person and others. By doing so, individuals with masculinized brains as a result of pre-natal and adult life testosterone and androgens enhance their resource acquiring abilities in order to survive, attract and copulate with mates as much as possible. [79] The masculinization of the brain is not just mediated by testosterone levels at the adult stage, but also testosterone exposure in the womb as a fetus. Higher pre-natal testosterone indicated by a low digit ratio as well as adult testosterone levels increased risk of fouls or aggression among male players in a soccer game. [81] Studies have also found higher pre-natal testosterone or lower digit ratio to be correlated with higher aggression in males. [82] [83] [84] [85] [86]

Testosterone drug interactions

testosterone drug interactions

The second theory is similar and is known as "evolutionary neuroandrogenic (ENA) theory of male aggression". [79] [80] Testosterone and other androgens have evolved to masculinize a brain in order to be competitive even to the point of risking harm to the person and others. By doing so, individuals with masculinized brains as a result of pre-natal and adult life testosterone and androgens enhance their resource acquiring abilities in order to survive, attract and copulate with mates as much as possible. [79] The masculinization of the brain is not just mediated by testosterone levels at the adult stage, but also testosterone exposure in the womb as a fetus. Higher pre-natal testosterone indicated by a low digit ratio as well as adult testosterone levels increased risk of fouls or aggression among male players in a soccer game. [81] Studies have also found higher pre-natal testosterone or lower digit ratio to be correlated with higher aggression in males. [82] [83] [84] [85] [86]

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